Move Thru Me - Turnstile

Move Thru Me - Turnstile

By Barnaby Britten

If you listen to hardcore and you haven’t heard of Turnstile by now then you’re not doing it right. With two mosh-worthy EPs under their belt, last year’s full-length Nonstop Feeling cemented their position as one of hardcore’s brightest talents. This didn’t go unnoticed by major labels, and somewhat surprisingly, the Baltimore crew signed with the predominantly metal and hard rock label Roadrunner Records earlier this year. But before we are treated to their major label debut, Turnstile have put out a four-song, eight-minute 7-inch called Move Thru Me on their DIY label, Pop Wig Records.

 Album design by Citizen guitarist  Nick Hamm .

Album design by Citizen guitarist Nick Hamm.

This record is basically confirmation of the fact that Turnstile are one of the funnest bands in hardcore right now. First track “Come Back For More” begins with an intro that would have you believe an ungodly, heavy groove is about to drop, but instead the band explodes into breakneck punk mode. The track eventually winds down and flows nicely into the one minute wonder “Harder On You” which is basically that one heavy groove that you’d been waiting for. The B-side kicks off with the title-track, which is a classic Turnstile stomper: a mid-paced riff-fest with some tasty gang vocals and signature leads. Final track “Fuck Me Blind” is a cover (originally by D.C. post-hardcore band Give) with guest vocals from Petal’s Kiley Lotz; It is the by far the biggest experimentation that Turnstile have made thus far with their sound, and they actually pull it off. While they’ve never been afraid to use a major key, “Fuck Me Blind” is almost a whole new level for Turnstile and it ends the EP on a sweet note, but also raises the question: is this the kind of stuff they’re going to start writing themselves?


All in all, Move Thru Me is a satisfying goodbye to Turnstile’s days in the underground. It is by no means the band’s best effort, but it shows them expanding their sound even further from the relatively straight up 90s hardcore blueprint they started out with on their first two EPs. The Rage Against the Machine worship of Nonstop Feeling has been punked out and they’re only getting more happy to exhibit their propensity for melodicism. It’s going to be very interesting indeed to see where they go with their first output on Roadrunner.


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Stage Four - Touché Amoré

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