Album Review: The Haze - Pulled Apart By Horses

Album Review: The Haze - Pulled Apart By Horses

Pulled Apart By Horses spring back into the new year with a brand new release, The Haze. Their fourth - and most complete - studio album to date. No if's, and's, or but's.

Image Credit: Universal Music Group
Photography: Neil Krug

The follow-up to Blood, their 2014 full-length seemingly overshadowed by releases from big guns Foo Fighters, You Me At Six and Gerard Way, PABH have made the biggest splash in this year's rock pool, soaking competition with weighty instrumentation, industrious guitar licks and rugged glam-rock vocals. As dated a direction in rock 'n roll as that may seem by today's standards, they've revived the flamboyant, 70's psychedelic flair and thrown in a fuck load of attitude. And yeah, new drummer Tommy Davidson will really "kick your dick in."

A 10 second foley of quietly chirping birds and bicycle bells are quickly disrupted by frontman Tom Hudson yelling - "I woke up in the haze again" - on title-track opener "The Haze"; a chill shoots straight down your spine, you prepare for the rest of the mayhem to ensue. Needless to say, we're hit with James Brown's twang and then in comes that all important dick-kicking from Davidson to get you out of your seat for the next 40 minutes.

"The Big What If" video
Art directed, directed & produced by: Lord Whitney

The two main singles that follow, "The Big What If" and "Hotel Motivation", both combine punchy pop cadences in the mid section, with explosive stadium-rock melodies in the chorus; a stunning illusion that would leave you questioning whether they actually did record this record in a dairy farm in rural Wales. Nevertheless, production is tight, and they continue to amp up thick, hard-rock riffs, like the beefy hook on "Prince of Meats" and the Sabbath-esque chords on "What's up Dude?".

"Hotel Motivation" video
Directed by: Lewis Cater
Produced by: James Norbery

It doesn't stop there; we get punk vibes on "Flash Lads", indie-rock sentiments on "Neighbourhood Watch" and a post-punk revival effort on "Moonbather". Even a change of pace on "Lamping" does nothing to damage their rockabilly reputation. The closing pair on the record, "My Evil Twin" and "Dumb Fun", then summon the strength of hard-rock anthems and pack in ample sing-along opportunities, with the latter offering up considerable scope for air-guitars and banging heads.

PABH have evidently played around with a bunch of different styles to amount to their final trade-off, but they never stray too far from their roots of their eponymous debut (2010) and their previous LP Blood. Howbeit, there's still noticeable progression; progression in both their demeanour and their description. Forget Night People. Forget Oczy MlodyThe Haze is your new rock favourite rock record.

Elliott Quince's #IllustratedAlbums

Elliott Quince's #IllustratedAlbums

Pete McKee produces limited edition Oasis Hacienda '94 prints

Pete McKee produces limited edition Oasis Hacienda '94 prints